Supplements

Nutrition & Supplements For Cartilage Regeneration

Cartilage Damage Symptoms & Treatment

Cartilage: for anyone who has damaged their cartilage or sought medical advice for an associated injury will only learn from hindsight the importance of taking care.

Symptoms of cartilage troubles include joint pain, stiffness or swelling. Your joints may also lock, buckle or ‘catch’ when moving normally. You may also experience a feeling of grinding.

If you are concerned about cartilage damage you should, of course, contact a doctor, but there are measures that you can take if the issue is minor. Rest and elevation of the affected limb are important, as well as icing the injury for fifteen-minute durations throughout the day. When exercising you can use braces on your knee, ankle, wrist and elbow, which allows movement and circulation while providing the extra support. Compression clothing may have a similar effect. Whilst this isn’t a cure for joint troubles, it can alleviate the pressure of impact when walking for example, as well as swollen muscles.

Damaged cartilage may be treated by surgery. Unfortunately, exercise cannot resolve cartilage issues and may exacerbate any condition that you have. It is often caused by repeated impact so wearing the correct footwear for running, football, rugby and any other sport associated with heavier impact is important.

Dodgy joint pains are often associated with old age but whilst, with advancing years, wear and tear are factors in weakened joints, injuries and cartilage troubles can affect all ages.

Diet & Supplements To Aid Cartilage Regeneration

You might be surprised to learn that what you eat has an effect on the condition of your joints. Here are just a few dietary suggestions for healthier knees, elbows, ankles and shoulders:

Oily Foods

Lubricin is a type of protein. It is a surface-active mucinous glycoprotein secreted in the synovial joint that plays an important role in the integrity of your cartilage. All foods that are a good source of lubricin are therefore good for your bones and cartilage. Extra-virgin olive oil is a great source of lubricin, which explains the good health benefits associated with Mediterranean foods and lashings of extra virgin oil on your salad.

Foods High in Vitamins and Minerals

What’s good for your bones can also benefit your cartilage. A good intake of calcium, vitamin D and vitamin C promotes healthy bones. Colourful fruits, red peppers, kale and apples are essentials for your shopping list.

On the subject of veg, carrots and green peas promote the production of Hyaluronic acid, which covers your bones at the point where the joints move.

Vitamin D3 plays a part in building strong bones and preserving cartilage joints. A healthy free dose is a spot of sunshine and, when winter inevitably comes, supplements are encouraged by many doctors.

Anti-Inflammatory Foods

Foods with anti-inflammatory properties are good for relieving pain, stiffness and swelling that affects your joints. Here, omega-3 fatty acids are your ally. Excellent sources include oily fish, walnuts and eggs.

Foods High In Sulphur

Eggs are invaluable in many ways and for the joint care, they are high in sulphur, which helps to produce the cartilage shell surrounding the fluid. Another source of sulphur is garlic.

 

 

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Faye Reid

Faye Reid

Writer and expert

Faye has a MSc in Sport Physiology and Nutrition, and puts her passion into practice as goal attack for her netball team, and in competitive event riding. She enjoys a pun, and in her spare time loves dog walking and eating out.


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